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Orion Test Booster | Ascent Abort-2

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Cape Canaveral, FL, USA
July 2, 2019, 11 a.m.
Status: Success
Mission:

Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) is a scheduled test of the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Orion spacecraft.

Sub-Orbital
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Ares I | Ares I-X

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
Sept. 28, 2009, 3:30 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Test Flight

The Ares I-X vehicle used in the test flight was similar in shape, mass, and size to the planned configuration of later Ares I vehicles, but had largely dissimilar internal hardware consisting of only one powered stage. Ares I vehicles were intended to launch Orion crew exploration vehicles. Along with the Ares V launch system and the Altair lunar lander, Ares I and Orion were part of NASA's Constellation Program, which was developing the spacecraft for U.S. human spaceflight after the Space Shuttle fleet was retired.

Sub-Orbital
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Saturn IB | Apollo–Soyuz Test Project

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
July 15, 1975, 7:50 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project was the first joint US-Soviet space flight and the last crewed US space mission until the Space Shuttle program. The US side of mission began on July 15, 1975, 19:50:00 UTC, launching Commander Thomas P. Stafford, Command Module Pilot Vance D. Brand and Docking Module Pilot Donald K. Slayton into orbit. Two days later, they docked with the Soyuz 19 spacecraft. American and Soviet crews visited each other's spacecrafts, performed docking and redocking maneuvers, conducted joint scientific experiments, exchanged flags and gifts. Crews spent more than 44 hours together, and after final parting of the ships on July 19, Apollo crew spent nine more days in orbit, conducting Earth observation experiments. The Apollo crew returned to Earth on July 24, 1975, 21:18:0 UTC with a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

Low Earth Orbit
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Saturn IB | Skylab 4

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
Nov. 16, 1973, 2:01 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Skylab 4 (also known as SL-4 or SLM-3) was the third and the last crewed mission to the first US orbital space station Skylab. The mission began on November 16, 1973, 14:01:23 UTC with the launch of a three-person crew. Crew members were the Commander Gerald P. Carr, Science Pilot Edward G. Gibson and William R. Pogue. During their 83-day stay on the station, crew performed Earth and solar observations. The mission ended successfully with the splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on February 8, 1974, 15:16:53 UTC.

Low Earth Orbit
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Saturn IB | Skylab 3

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
July 28, 1973, 11:10 a.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Skylab 3 (also known as SL-3 or SLM-2) was the second crewed mission to the first US orbital space station Skylab. The mission began on July 28, 1973, 11:10:50 UTC with the launch of a three-person crew. Crew members were the Commander Alan L. Bean, Science Pilot Owen K. Garriott and Pilot Jack R. Lousma. During their 59-day stay on the station, crew continued station repairs and conducted various scientific and medical experiments. The mission ended successfully with the splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on September 25, 1973, 22:19:51 UTC.

Low Earth Orbit
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Saturn IB | Skylab 2

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
May 25, 1973, 1 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Skylab 2 (also known as SL-2 or SLM-1) was the first crewed mission to the first US orbital space station Skylab. The mission began on May 25, 1973, 13:00:00 UTC with the launch of a three-person crew. Crew members were the Commander Charles "Pete" Conrad, Jr., Science Pilot Joseph P. Kerwin and Pilot Paul J. Weitz. During their 26-day stay on the station, crew performed station repairs and conducted scientific, medical experiments, gathered solar and Earth science data. The mission ended successfully with the splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on June 22, 1973, 13:49:48 UTC.

Low Earth Orbit
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Saturn V | Skylab 1

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
May 14, 1973, 4:37 p.m.
Status: Success
Unknown Mission

There are no mission or payload details available for this launch.


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Saturn V | Apollo 17

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
Dec. 7, 1972, 5:33 a.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Apollo 17 was the final mission of the Apollo program. The craft was crewed by Commander Eugene Cernan, Lunar Module Pilot Harrison Schmitt & Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans. The mission lasted for 12 days, 13 hours, 51 minutes and 59 seconds during which time Cernan & Schmitt spent 3 days on lunar surface completing three moonwalks to collect lunar samples and install scientific instruments on the surface. Apollo 17 was the last time human beings have gone beyond Low Earth Orbit.

Lunar Orbit
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Saturn V | Apollo 16

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
April 16, 1972, 5:54 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Apollo 16 was the 10th crewed launch of the Apollo program. The craft was crewed by Commander John Young, Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly & Lunar Module Pilot Charles Duke. The mission duration was 11 days, 1 hour, 51 minutes & 5 seconds during which time Young and Duke spent 71 hours on the surface of the Moon spending a total of 20 hours and 14 minutes on moonwalks while Mattingly spend 126 hours or 64 orbits in lunar orbit. While conducting moonwalks, Young and Duke collected 95.8Kg of lunar samples. During return trip to Earth Mattingly performed an EVA to collect film cassettes from the exterior of the service module.

Lunar Orbit
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Saturn V | Apollo 15

National Aeronautics and Space Administration | USA
Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA
July 26, 1971, 1:34 p.m.
Status: Success
Mission: Human Exploration

Apollo 15 was the 9th manned mission in the Apollo program and 4th to land on the moon. It was a successful mission although controversial as the astronauts carried unauthorized postage stamps which they planned to sell. Commander David Scott, Lunar Module Pilot James Irwin and Command Module Pilot Alfred Worden were on board. The Mission lasted 12 days 7 hours, which included 1 cislunar EVA and 4 lunar surface EVA's. This was also the first mission the lunar rover was used.

Lunar Orbit
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